Photo 31 Aug 2 notes … may say that as a service economy we are henceforth so far removed from the realities of production and work on the world that we inhabit a dream world of artificial stimuli and televised experience.

-Fredric Jameson

… may say that as a service economy we are henceforth so far removed from the realities of production and work on the world that we inhabit a dream world of artificial stimuli and televised experience.

-Fredric Jameson

Photo 23 May solar tracking system

solar tracking system

Photo 3 Nov 3,439 notes eatsleepdraw:

“everything can be there” by mfirmino
flickr | tumblr | facebook

eatsleepdraw:

“everything can be there” by mfirmino

flickr | tumblr | facebook

Photo 2 Nov 2,245 notes crantashine:

business-and-technology:

IBM solar collector magnifies sun by 2,000x (without cooking itself), costs 3x less than similar systems
Cleverly combining solar PV with solar thermal to reach 80% conversion efficiency
Concentrating the sun’s ray onto solar photovoltaic (PV) modules requires walking the fine line between optimizing power output and not literally melting your very expensive super-high-efficiency solar cells. A team led by IBM Research seems to have found a way to push back the line. They have created a High Concentration PhotoVoltaic Thermal (HCPVT) system that is capable of concentrating the power of 2,000 suns onto hundreds of triple junction photovoltaic chips measuring a single square centimeter each (they even claim to be able to keep temperatures safe up to 5,000x). The trick is that each solar PV cell is cooled using technology developed for supercomputers; microchannels inspired by blood vessels but only a few tens of micrometers in width pipe liquid coolant in and extract heat “10 times more effective than with passive air cooling.”

Waste not
The beauty is that this heat is not just thrown away. This system gets useful work out of it. So while the PV modules are 30%+ efficient at converting the sun’s light into electricity, another 50% of the sun’s energy is captured as heat and can then be used to do things like thermal water desalination and adsorption cooling. This means that the system is capable of converting around 80% of the collected solar energy into useable energy (though the electricity is of course more useful than the thermal energy).

A single collector can produce about 25 kilowatts of electricity. Below is a closeup of some PV cells where the light is being concentrated. Notice the piping to bring the liquid coolant.
"The design of the system is elegantly simple," said Andrea Pedretti , chief technology officer at Airlight Energy. "We replace expensive steel and glass with low cost concrete and simple pressurized metalized foils. The small high-tech components, in particular the microchannel coolers and the molds, can be manufactured in Switzerland with the remaining construction and assembly done in the region of the installation. This leads to a win-win situation where the system is cost competitive and jobs are created in both regions."

This has been around for ages. All over Australiahttp://www.silex.com.au/businesses/solar-systems

crantashine:

business-and-technology:

IBM solar collector magnifies sun by 2,000x (without cooking itself), costs 3x less than similar systems

Cleverly combining solar PV with solar thermal to reach 80% conversion efficiency

Concentrating the sun’s ray onto solar photovoltaic (PV) modules requires walking the fine line between optimizing power output and not literally melting your very expensive super-high-efficiency solar cells. A team led by IBM Research seems to have found a way to push back the line. They have created a High Concentration PhotoVoltaic Thermal (HCPVT) system that is capable of concentrating the power of 2,000 suns onto hundreds of triple junction photovoltaic chips measuring a single square centimeter each (they even claim to be able to keep temperatures safe up to 5,000x). The trick is that each solar PV cell is cooled using technology developed for supercomputers; microchannels inspired by blood vessels but only a few tens of micrometers in width pipe liquid coolant in and extract heat “10 times more effective than with passive air cooling.”

Waste not

The beauty is that this heat is not just thrown away. This system gets useful work out of it. So while the PV modules are 30%+ efficient at converting the sun’s light into electricity, another 50% of the sun’s energy is captured as heat and can then be used to do things like thermal water desalination and adsorption cooling. This means that the system is capable of converting around 80% of the collected solar energy into useable energy (though the electricity is of course more useful than the thermal energy).

A single collector can produce about 25 kilowatts of electricity. Below is a closeup of some PV cells where the light is being concentrated. Notice the piping to bring the liquid coolant.

"The design of the system is elegantly simple," said Andrea Pedretti , chief technology officer at Airlight Energy. "We replace expensive steel and glass with low cost concrete and simple pressurized metalized foils. The small high-tech components, in particular the microchannel coolers and the molds, can be manufactured in Switzerland with the remaining construction and assembly done in the region of the installation. This leads to a win-win situation where the system is cost competitive and jobs are created in both regions."

This has been around for ages. All over Australia

http://www.silex.com.au/businesses/solar-systems

Photo 4 Oct If only if

If only if

Text 4 Oct If only if

If we could travel near speed of light that will be breath taking, if we could travel a light years in one month’s time we’d call Europa our third home, ~ in one week’s time we can view our galaxy from a wider perspective and visit near by solar systems, ~ in one day’s time we could bring voyager 1 & 2 home and send a dozen more, ~ in one hour’s time we could visit alpha centauri and have picnic near by, ~ in one second!? if only if…we look back… I’d still call Earth HOME.

Photo 16 Jul 1 note Work hard, learn more; play harder, discover more; to love, and Die hardcore.

Work hard, learn more; play harder, discover more; to love, and Die hardcore.

Photo 15 Jul 心

Photo 15 Jul Space, more of that please

Space, more of that please

Quote 15 Jun
'Tough times don't last, tough people do.' - ???

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